So Long, My Son review; Personhood under siege

To say I was blown away is an understatement. Spanning three generations of family and the tumultuous shifts of history from The Cultural Revolution to the One-child policy to the rapid economic expansion of modern China, this is a staggering film that is at once intensely personal and tremendously steeped in the wider socio-economic forces…

‘The Body Remembers When The World Broke Open’ review

When two women of Indigenous descent meet in a chance encounter, their lives, fears, identities and predicaments are illuminated in the subliminal tension of mundane moments; The quiet silence of thought and apprehension, the disquieting stillness of mixed emotions and the unfiltered sounds and words of muttered breaths, internal conflict and desolate resignation. As one…

Best films of 2018.

This is my fifth year doing my best movies of the year list; And each year that passes does not disappoint. I haven’t blogged in about half a year because I’ve been so caught up with different things. 2018 has been a year of big changes and busy times. Now that I’ve settled down into…

Lady Bird review; A chorus for youth

With a singular vision to portray her own experiences in her youth, Greta Gerwig has spoken for us all. Greta Gerwig’s heartfelt, funny and deeply resonant film is so great and so full of life and love for the characters she portrays. While Lady Bird may contain several characters archtypes and isn’t necessarily as ground-breaking…

The Killing Of A Sacred Deer review; A metaphor without a beating heart

The Killing Of A Sacred Deer is Yorgos Lanthimos’ new film after Dogtooth and The Lobster and follows the director’s bizarre and uncompromising approach to film. Drawing from Euriphides’ fable,¬†Iphigenia at Aulis, The Killing Of A Sacred Deer is a modern take on ideas of fated tragedy, familial responsibility, human error and the inherent violence…

Graduation; A perfect film

Graduation is a rare film because it nails everything from the opening to the end, from it’s morally abstruse¬†social commentary to the way in which it captures the raw essence of each scene and makes them all mean something. There are few films that you come across in your life that hit you speechless and…

Lion review; Love which connects us all

If Room had me slobbering last year, Lion is this year’s heartwarming, gut-wrenching and rousingly resounding affirmation of the power of love. Based on the true story of Saroo Brierley, the family drama transcends beyond itself to many others who have lost their loved ones and provides some reprieve to grieving hearts. This isn’t just…

The Childhood Of A Leader; Interesting,obscure but lacking.

One could go about analyzing all the different aspects of The Childhood Of A Leader and find yourself as clueless as before. The moody atmosphere sets up the story but the story is evidently lacking. Brady Corbet uses instances of mischief and tantrums to justify his point…his point being that such uncontrolled behavioural problems are…

Catch Me If You Can;Blindspot review #2

Catch Me If You Can is my #2 Blindspot review of the year. Yes I know I’m a little behind schedule but I’ll try my best to get all of them out before the year ends :p If you dont know what the blindspot series is, it’s a little something that some movie bloggers like…

Midnight Special review: The glow in the gloom

Though it has been compared to ET and Close encounters of a third kind, I refrain from making such connections because I forgot the former and I haven’t watched the latter. Even so, Midnight Special is a mighty film in its own right. Jeff Nichols is a relatively new director and his previous film, Mud,…