Honey Boy review; A transcendent story of trauma

In Alma Ha’rel’s intensely personal Honey Boy, Shia LaBeouf plays his own emotionally broken and abusive father. In vicariously projecting his pain for us to see, he transforms this film into therapy for him and for those of use who grew up with a difficult childhood. Shia LaBeouf’s brave honesty and Alma Ha’rel’s sensitive treatment…

First Reformed review; The limits of faith

Paul Schrader is well known for writing the screenplay for Taxi Driver, a universally well-known depiction of isolation, self-destruction and the dichotomy between egos and heroes in the new age. Taxi Driver characterized the feeling of loneliness in the swamp of big cities and the descent of normal people into madness. Society moves so fast…

Hereditary review; The tragic nature of human frailty

Some spoilers ahead so read at your own risk. If you have not seen the film, I suggest you read the review after you’ve seen the movie. Hereditary was one of my most anticipated movies of 2018. After hearing critics rave about it at Sundance for being one of the scariest films they’ve ever seen,…

Cannes 2017 lineup preview; Damn I wished I was there!

This year’s Cannes lineup is looking like it’s going to be a special one. Cannes has always been the artistic one compared to the other awards but they usually still feature a big name or two from Hollywood. This year’s selection finally embraces the Cannes uniqueness and verve as it’s jam packed full of quiet…

Graduation; A perfect film

Graduation is a rare film because it nails everything from the opening to the end, from it’s morally abstruse social commentary to the way in which it captures the raw essence of each scene and makes them all mean something. There are few films that you come across in your life that hit you speechless and…

Logan; Humanistic portrayals and redemption

Logan is my first proper 2017 film-release movie review. But let’s detract abit here. After a pretty exciting awards season last year which, for the first time, awarded Best Picture to a movie (Moonlight) which was also my favourite, 2017 seemed to cement itself as the year for the underdogs. It saw Roger Federer came…

Book review #1: The Vegetarian

This is my first book review and it shouldn’t really be my first because I should have started this a while back ago! I love books as much as I love movies but I always take too long to read them. I have read a few good ones in the past year, so I figured…

The Neon Demon review; The figment is the flesh

I’m afraid auteur might even be an understatement for Nicholas Winding Refn. His first major film is his only universally appreciated film. Every major work since has been a cosmos of stylistic violence and stark imagery. Maybe it’s because of his partial colour-blindness and the way he that he compensates his art for himself.  Visually, it’s…

The Childhood Of A Leader; Interesting,obscure but lacking.

One could go about analyzing all the different aspects of The Childhood Of A Leader and find yourself as clueless as before. The moody atmosphere sets up the story but the story is evidently lacking. Brady Corbet uses instances of mischief and tantrums to justify his point…his point being that such uncontrolled behavioural problems are…

Nocturnal Animals trailer

It’s now 1AM over here; How apt 😉 But I hope I don’t become a nocturnal animal like these crazies in the trailer. There is some intense shi* cooking up here that I’m so excited for. Nocturnal Animals has been on my radar ever since the start of 2016. But judging from the trailer alone,it…

Train To Busan; Finally, a zombie film about humans

Train To Busan is the closest zombie film to date I’ve seen that transcends beyond the post-apocalyptic zombie genre. Finally. This one moves beyond the living and the undead to expose humankind’s nature;It examines the human condition in ways both rotten and redeeming. It bears little semblance to Bong Joon-Ho’s Snowpiercer. It is markedly less…